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Acceptable Leg Length Discrepancy After Hip Replacement
01.07.2017 10:37
Overview

Leg length discrepancies are differences between the lengths of your legs. Not only can the actual difference vary from person to person but also how much it affects daily life. Small discrepancies often go unnoticed and do not need to be treated. Larger differences may affect posture or cause a limp during walking. The discrepancy may be from the upper leg bone (femur) or the lower leg bone (tibia).Leg Length Discrepancy

Causes

The causes of LLD are many, including a previous injury, bone infection, bone diseases (dysplasias), inflammation (arthritis) and neurologic conditions. Previously broken bones may cause LLD by healing in a shortened position, especially if the bone was broken in many pieces (comminuted) or if skin and muscle tissue around the bone were severely injured and exposed (open fracture). Broken bones in children sometimes grow faster for several years after healing, causing the injured bone to become longer. Also, a break in a child?s bone through a growth center (located near the ends of the bone) may cause slower growth, resulting in a shorter extremity. Bone infections that occur in children while they are growing may cause a significant LLD, especially during infancy. Bone diseases may cause LLD, as well; examples are neurofibromatosis, multiple hereditary exostoses and Ollier disease. Inflammation of joints during growth may cause unequal extremity length. One example is juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. Osteoarthritis, the joint degeneration that occurs in adults, very rarely causes a significant LLD.

Symptoms

Often there are few or no symptoms prior to the age of 25-35. The most common symptom is chronic lower back pain, but also is frequently middle and upper back pain. Same-sided and repeated injury or pain to the hip, knee and/or ankle is also a hallmark of a long-standing untreated LLD. It is not uncommon to have buttock or radiating hip pain that is non-dermatomal (not from a disc) and tends to go away when lying down.

Diagnosis

A qualified musculoskeletal expert will first take a medical history and conduct a physical exam. Other tests may include X-rays, MRI, or CT scan to diagnose the root cause.

Non Surgical Treatment

In order to measure for correction, use a series of blocks or sheets of firm material (cork or neoprene) of varying thickness, e.g., 1/8", 1/4", and 1/2". Place them under the short limb, either under the heel or the entire foot, depending on the pathology, until the patient feels most balanced. Usually you will not be able to correct for the full amount of the imbalance at the outset. The longer a patient has had the LLD, the less likely he or she will be able to tolerate a full correction immediately. This is a process of incremental improvements. 2 inch External Platform Lift Bear in mind that the initial lift may need to be augmented as the patient's musculoskeletal system begins to adjust. It is often recommended that the initial buildup should be 50 percent of the total. After a suitable break-in period, one month say, another 25 percent can be added. If warranted, the final 25 percent can be added a month later. Once you determine how much lift the patient can handle, you then need to decide how to best apply it. There are certain advantages and disadvantages to using either internal or external heel lifts.

LLD Shoe Inserts

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Surgical Treatment

Limb deformity or leg length problems can be treated by applying an external frame to the leg. The frame consists of metal rings which go round the limb. The rings are held onto the body by wires and metal pins which pass through the skin and are anchored into the bone. During this operation, the bone is divided. Gradual adjustment of the frame results in creation of a new bone allowing a limb to be lengthened. The procedure involves the child having an anaesthetic. The child is normally in hospital for one week. The child and family are encouraged to clean pin sites around the limb. The adjustments of the frame (distractions) are performed by the child and/or family. The child is normally encouraged to walk on the operated limb and to actively exercise the joints above and below the frame. The child is normally reviewed on a weekly basis in clinic to monitor the correction of the deformity. The frame normally remains in place for 3 months up to one year depending on the condition which is being treated. The frame is normally removed under a general anaesthetic at the end of treatment.
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